Laudal (municipality)

Laudal is a former municipality located in the old Vest-Agder county in Norway. The 93-square-kilometre (36 sq mi) municipality existed from 1899 until 1964. The administrative centre of the municipality was the village of Laudal where Laudal Church is located. The municipality encompassed part of what is now the municipality of Lindesnes in Agder county.[2]

Laudal herred
Laudal within Vest-Agder
Coordinates: 58°14′49″N 07°30′16″E
CountryNorway
CountyVest-Agder
DistrictSørlandet
Established1 Jan 1899
Disestablished1 Jan 1964
Administrative centreLaudal
Area
  Total93 km2 (36 sq mi)
 *Area at municipal dissolution.
Population
 (1964)
  Total560
  Density6.0/km2 (16/sq mi)
Demonym(s)Laudøl[1]
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-1022
Preceded byØyslebø og Laudal in 1899
Succeeded byMarnardal in 1964

History

The municipality was established on 1 January 1899 when the old municipality of Øyslebø og Laudal was divided into two municipalities: Øyslebø (population: 991) and Laudal (population: 836). During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, Laudal municipality was dissolved and its land was merged with parts of the neighboring municipalities of Øyslebø, Bjelland, and Finsland to create the new municipality of Marnardal. Prior to the merger, Laudal had a population of 560.[3]

Name

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the old Laudal farm (Old Norse: Laugardalr), since that is the location of Laudal Church. The first element of the name of the farm comes from the old name for the river, Laug, (now the Lågåna river) and the last element (Old Norse: dalr) means "valley". Therefore, the name means "Laug river valley".[2][4]

Government

All municipalities in Norway, including Laudal, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality was governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elected a mayor.[5]

Municipal council

The municipal council (Herredsstyre) of Laudal was made up of representatives that were elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the final municipal council was as follows:

Laudal Herredsstyre 19601963 [6]  
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)8
Total number of members:13
Laudal Herredsstyre 19561959 [7]  
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)8
Total number of members:13
Laudal Herredsstyre 19521955 [8]  
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)7
Total number of members:12
Laudal Herredsstyre 19481951 [9]  
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)7
Total number of members:12
Laudal Herredsstyre 19451947 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
3
Total number of members:12
Laudal Herredsstyre 19381941* [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:12
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

See also

References

  1. "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. Store norske leksikon. "Laudal" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 22 November 2016.
  3. Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  4. Rygh, Oluf (1912). Norske gaardnavne: Lister og Mandals amt (in Norwegian) (9 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 99.
  5. Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  6. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  7. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  8. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  9. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  10. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  11. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Retrieved 21 November 2020.

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